Tag Archives: American Filipino

Emil Guillermo: Mourning historian and scholar Dawn Mabalon, Filipino American activist and friend; My Manilatown show on Aug. 17th dedicated to her memory.

I’m crestfallen, recovering from the news that my friend Dawn Mabalon, a tenured professor and scholar in U.S. History at San Francisco State University, specializing in Filipinos in the American Labor movement, has died.

Dawn was a bright, energetic ball of fire who took American Filipinos and U.S. history and fused it with an activist’s passion that empowered the ignored and enlightened the ignorant.

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If you didn’t know the story, you finally got it.
If you were heretofore invisible, you were finally seen.

She didn’t bother with the veritable first draft of history, a/k/a “the news.” Dawn, who originally set out to be a journalist, looked to make a lasting impact.  She got her Ph.D at Stanford and scaled the high bar of the academy. She produced legit scholarship about us in the United States, as if we really mattered.

Dawn Mabalon’s 2013 book, “Little Manila is in the Heart: The Making of the Filipino/a American Community in Stockton, California,” presented the forgotten Filipinos of America in an historical context that could not be shoved under any old rock.

It was there for all to see: A brilliant, personal, yet accessible scholarly work.

As I pondered what Dawn meant to Filipino Americans and the telling of the broader Asian American story, someone found a Facebook post of me and Dawn from her 2013 book launch. It was ten years after I first met her when I worked the diversity beat in Stockton. Along with Dillon Delvo, her Little Manila Foundation co-founder, Dawn was a key source as I wrote stories about their successful effort to preserve the blighted blocks of Stockton’s “Little Manila” into an historical district.

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Reading it now five years later just made me cry.

If all the dogeared pages of my copy are any proof, I’ve used that book she handed me like a bible. I compared my father’s story of coming to the U.S.  as a colonized American Filipino with the facts from Dawn’s scholarly work. While writing my one man show, “The Amok Monologues,” I often consulted Dawn’s book to make sure I wasn’t just true to heart, but true to history as well.

It’s the reason my Friday performance at San Francisco’s Manilatown  on Aug. 17th at 7:30 pm will be dedicated to her memory.
See the rest of my post at http://www.aaldef.org/blog

Emil Guillermo: Amok Monologues at FANHS National Museum in Stockton…Every First Sunday! Plus TICKET INFO on Aug.17 San Francisco show.

Emil does “Amok Monologues” in SF at the I-Hotel Manilatown site on the 90th Anniversary of his father’s arrival…. Aug. 17 in SF…. Donation:  $10.

CLICK FOR TICKETS!

See a review of the show at the Orlando Fringe Festival 2018:

Here’s what critics have said during my “Bang a gong, get it on”  World Tour:

“Stand-up, monologue, rant?….Enjoy trying to keep pace with Guillermo’s brilliant mind… Funny, poignant.”— Orlando Weekly.

 “Keeps audience engaged.” — Orlando Sentinel

“Charismatic…Guillermo’s life is one worth exploring.” — DC Metro Theater Arts

 “Excellent…Emil Guillermo knows how to tell a story and that ability sets “Amok Monologues above other solo shows.”  — San Diego Story

 Get tickets for Aug. 17.

Now for this week, and  for every month ongoing, come to Stockton to the FANHS Museum for First Sundays with Emil Amok  starting  Aug. 5,  2pm.

It’s a presentation/workshop of my Amok Monologues, and a workshop with audience members on how to find, write, and tell their stories.  Donation: $10

Aug. 5 in Stockton  First Sundays with Emil Amok at the FANHS Museum in Stockton to benefit the museum.

Aug. 17 in San Francisco “Amok Monologues: All Pucked Up” 

to  benefit  Manilatown Heritage Foundation.

 

First Sundays with Emil Amok…..Starting this Sunday, Aug. 5th!  2pm….  in Stockton.

After a successful soft launch last week, we’re all set to do a workshop of my  solo show, “Amok Monologues: All Pucked Up,” at the Filipino American National Historical Society Museum in Stockton, CA   EVERY FIRST SUNDAY….

STARTING AUGUST. 5 at 2pm, 337 E. Weber in Stockton

Suggested donation: $10

And as a BONUS: There’s a storytelling workshop where we develop your stories!

 

Help the FANHS National Museum and come see me grow my show every month. PLUS: Bonus workshop on how to tell your stories.

Come back each month and be part of the telling and learning!

First Sundays at the FANHS National Museum in Stockton at 2pm….

Starting August 5.  See the museum, then see the show!

Suggested donation: $10.

This is the evolution of my show that I started  touring last year in San Diego and Baltimore, and then this year in Orlando.
See what one unrelated, non-Filipino critic said, here.

Emil Guillermo: See me perform my “Amok Monologues.” Coming to Baltimore, MD, Nov. 4,5,11,12. Read what a critic (white, unrelated, awake for the whole thing) wrote.

Here’s where you can see me go amok .

 

For East Coast folks, I’m bringing “Amok” to Baltimore’s Charm City Fringe Festival, Nov. 4, 5, 11, 12.

Lots to do in Baltimore. Go to Little Italy.  Then head to the Bromo Arts district and see a Little Filipino show.

Get your Charm City Fringe tickets here.

The Amok Monologues are my stories told live taken from the columns I’ve written and my experiences as a an American Filipino growing up in the U.S., and working in the media.

It’s funny, tragic, provocative personal history.

An American Filipino story.

But here’s what critic Bill Eadie of San Diego Story, the area’s premiere arts journal, had to say:

Come and by and go “Amok.” And if you can’t make it, contact me and I’ll bring it to your city!

 

Emil Guillermo: Here’s where you can read and even listen to “Emil Amok,” like besides here at www.amok.com. Almost everything you’d want to know about what I’m up to, but somehow never bothered to Google. Or just click on the links to current tweets on the left of amok homepage for my latest amokness.

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Dear Amok readers:

You may have noticed, I  haven’t always been posting here on my site.

But click on this big link to see my writing at the Asian American Legal Defense Fund blog where I post columns each week.

My plan is to post my podcast here, a return to my radio days.

Real audio where you can hear stuff like I did on NPR.

So look for the podcast soon.

I am also working on some live performance projects.

A solo show on American Filipinos, “All Pucked Up.”

Some stand up for those with short-attention spans.

After dinner speeches for those with iron stomachs.

E-mail me at emilamok@gmail.com to book or for information on coming shows, mics, black box appearances, pop ups, etc.

In the meantime, I’m writing a lot about the campaign and other news  on the AALDEF blog,

And here on the Diverse blog.

And on Asian American issues in general   on the NBC News.com website.

So lots of places to go amok, besides right  here at amok.com.

Recently, it was National Dog Day, and I posted a picture of Willie, a mutt I named after my Dad.  Willie used to sing every time he  heard a ringtone of some sort.  And then the music died.

I miss both Willies.

 

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And of course, to read a little more about me,  go here.

Now pardon me, while I school this tall guy in how to play ball in a suit and tie.

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Emil Guillermo: Why I do what I do as an Asian American journalist

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I was young when I knew I would be a writer, or somehow be in the media. At five, I was already practicing my standups.

So is it a surprise I’m still a member of AAJA?

At the 15th Asian American Journalists Association convention being held in San Francisco:

I saw a woman I met at a previous AAJA who told me she was taking a leave to have a baby. With her female partner.

I saw a person with his wife and two young kids, making it a family vacation. Last I heard, he was not regularly employed.

I saw old friends who  were recently laid off or forcibly retired.

I saw a guy who could have been my boss had he taken a job ten years ago, but who is now happy as a stay-at-home-dad.

I saw an old agent, who is now a “producer.”

I saw a former colleague still trying to make the transition to digital.

And then there was a guy who showed me his gold watch after 25 years in one place. And another guy who told me his company didn’t give out gold watches. Not even after close to 40 years.  The paycheck was enough.

Lots of stories at AAJA about the evolution of the media and the media worker.

And as tough as some tales were, there were signs of hope too.

Young guys still climbing the market ladder getting air-time coming up to me saying they saw an old tape of mine, thanking me for showing the way. Another guy getting a national shot as a fill-in on a big time show.

We’re all still there because  AAJA always felt like a safe place to gather once a year and reassess why we still do what we do.

It’s a smaller gathering these days. Many have left the business, burned out, bitter, bummed. Or becoming lawyers. Involved in some other way with life.

But many of us,  after all these years are still here. Because the paycheck alone never defined us.

This is what we do.

See my piece on “Why I Write…” on the blog of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

 

Emil Guillermo: Rachel Dolezal, Dylann Roof aren’t going to wreck my Father’s Day.

On the race beat, we were all wearying of Rachel Dolezal’s tale knowing there was something more important to talk about.

But Dylann Roof’s old fashioned racism with the fresh-faced millennial look wouldn’t have been my first choice among replacement subjects.

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Roof’s massacre was deplorable. And his  tirade against blacks, sounded like the things said about Filipino immigrants like my Dad in one of the most racist periods in California in the 20s and 30s.

It made for an unlikely Father’s Day gift I wasn’t expecting.

Click here to read my column  on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund blog.

 

Emil Guillermo: Do Asian American lives really matter?

My cousin Stephen, an immigrant who had naturalized as an American, a proud Asian American of Filipino descent,  was shot and killed a year ago.

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So far, the family has seen no medical examiner’s report.

No police report.

Maybe none of it ever happened?

Do Asian American lives matter?

The family has been waiting for justice.

But it seems like all we are doing is waiting for paperwork.

 

CHECK OUT THE NEW HOME FOR THE AMOK COLUMN: www.aaldef.org/blog

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