Tag Archives: hate crimes

Emil Guillermo: Estate for Vincent Chin could use help tracking Chin’s killer

Helen Zia, the executor of the estate for Vincent Chin, said it can use some help keeping tabs on Ronald Ebens in Nevada.

Ebens, now 75, is the man who killed Chin in1982 in a disputed hate crime in Michigan.  Ebens plead guilty to a lesser charge and escaped jail time. A civil rights trail convicted Ebens in a subsequent trial in federal court. But that was reversed in appeal. (Read more about the case on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund blog).

Still, there was  a civil judgment of $1.5 million against Ebens that was won in Michigan. And that had grown to $8 million in 2012.

Zia told me opportunities to collect money are  often missed. Recently,  Ebens was the executor of the estate of a friend, who had just received a portion of a $4 million personal injury settlement.

In general, Zia  fears that too much time has passed to expect much of a recovery of the funds owed.  Time has also meant the Chin case has faded from the public’s memory. (See more of her comments on NBCnews.com). 

 

 

 

Emil Guillermo: Remembering Vincent Chin from June 19-June 23.

Vincent Chin was beaten with a baseball bat on June 19, 1982. He died on June 23.

We should take this time to remember the hate crime that awakened the Asian American community.

I’ve written about this over the years, but in last year’s I talked about a special commemoration.  Maybe for the 35th?  Click here to read my column on that idea on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund blog.vincentchin

 

 

More on Randy Gener, Filipino American journalist, who was assaulted in NYC

As I wrote in my post ( http://aaldef.org/blog/amid-the-super-bowl-hype-randy-geners-story-is-more-typical-of-the-asian-american-immigrant-story.html ), I consider it still an open question if what happened to Randy Gener is considered a bias crime against the Filipino gay journalist.

The police think not. I say, hold on.

Hate crime or not, the family is of Gener is very gracious in this public statement issued on Jan. 29, 2014:

The family of Randy Gener would like to thank all of the people who have helped move along the investigation. We are thankful to the New York Police Department, particularly the Hate Crimes Task Force, for conducting a thorough and swift investigation. We are eternally grateful to the community (particularly the Filipino American and arts communities) for raising awareness about this incident, for showing solidarity and generosity through organizing vigils and events, and for creating a fund to support ongoing medical expenses. Finally, we are thankful for all who have benevolently offered their services, particularly the New York City Anti-Violence Project.

We are pleased and relieved that a suspect has finally been apprehended and trust that the NYPD and District Attorney will make all efforts to bring justice for Randy. At this time, we are focusing on Randy’s healing and moving forward together as a family.

 
Stephen Nisbet & Jessica Blair-Driessler

Nisbet is Gener’s husband. Blair-Driessler, Gener’s sister. It’s still unclear if their views have changed now that the police are saying it was not a hate crime.

In the meantime, a fundraising effort for Gener’s medical costs is located on this website:

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/for-randy-gener/130589

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Updates: HBO’s “Luck,” PETA, Dharun Ravi

If you saw the latest “Luck,” on HBO, it’s curious how the American Humane Association logo, and the “No Animals were harmed” disclaimer still appears in the credits. Maybe none were harmed in that episode, but with the record of the show of at least 3 deaths, who can say?

The phrase “no animals harmed…” has become such a cliche that it’s unclear what it really means anymore. And now we know what it’s meant on “Luck.”

The reaction to my piece about my wife and luck at http://blog.sfgate.com/eguillermo
has been interesting.

A few took me as bragging about my wife’s work as a PETA VP.

But I was merely sharing an insider’s perspective of how real modern day activism works. It’s not just picket signs and demos. It’s practically investigative journalism. And in this case there is a symbiotic relationship between the activist and the media that most people don’t realize.

The other thing I’m amazed about is the reaction from the horse racing industry to the cancellation of “Luck.” The industry should be happy the show was cancelled. “Luck” focused on a “Sopranos” goes to Santa Anita story line that made the whole enterprise of racing look sleazy, dishonest and populated by degenerate low-lifes. I know that can make for good TV, but it doesn’t breed public trust in an industry that is dying. No one was calling for the abolition of horse racing. But wouldn’t it be nice if the game were fair and humane? As it was, “Luck” depicted the industry as just the opposite, and yet people are angry at PETA for uncovering the deaths of the horses which led to the canceling of the show. “Luck” defenders like to shrug off the horse deaths by saying accidents happen. Yeah, sure, in real races. I go back to the basic issue: Real horses shouldn’t die in fake races.

“Luck” had no real defense. Its cancellation was humane, considering the production wasn’t.

RAVI, TYLER CLEMENTI, AND THE RUTGERS CASE

If you haven’t seen my post go to www.aaldef.org/blog

It’s funny how hate crimes and cyber-bullying have all been rolled up into one blobby mess of intolerance. That’s good, but the broader definition will mean less clarity on hate crimes than ever, more and harsher punishment, and a whole lot less freedom in general.

Is that really what we want? Isn’t there a better way to demand we all show a little kindness, civility and mutual respect to each other?

The Tyler Clementi/Rutgers suicide story:Hate crime or just an invasion of privacy?

How do you characterize the Tyler Clementi story. He’s the Rutgers student who killed himself last year days after his roommate put video of him romantically engaged with another male on the internet. 

Is it cyber-bullying? An invasion of privacy? Is it a hate crime?

Read my “Amok” column at www.aaldef.org/blog