Tag Archives: politics

Emil Guillermo: Majority of Asian Americans joined in the 2018 midterm rebuke of Trump, according to AALDEF Asian American Exit Poll findings (NEW)

The mainstream media never gets a big enough sample to say anything about Asian Americans.
Here are the results from the AALDEF exit poll of 7,600 Asian Americans in 50 cities in 14 states.
The findings are clear.
The majority of Asian Americans joined in the rebuke of Donald Trump in the 2018 midterm elections.

AALDEF’s Election Day exit poll of more than 7,600 Asian American voters, Democratic candidates were favored over Republicans by wide margins

New York City… AALDEF’s preliminary exit poll results of more than 7,600 Asian American voters in the 2018 midterm elections reveal that Asian Americans strongly favored Democratic Senate and Gubernatorial candidates in closely-contested races in Texas, Georgia, Nevada, and Florida.

Asian American voters polled also disapproved of Donald Trump’s performance as president, with 65% disapproving and 21% approving, a factor that likely affected their votes in key elections.

“The racist and anti-immigrant rhetoric from Donald Trump has been deeply disturbing to Asian American voters, who overwhelmingly supported candidates who share their values of a more inclusive and diverse America,” said Margaret Fung, AALDEF executive director.

AALDEF dispatched more than 600 attorneys, law students, and community volunteers to 50 cities in 14 states to document voter problems on Election Day and to conduct a nonpartisan Asian American exit poll in English and 11 Asian languages Asian Americans were polled in California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

AALDEF Democracy Program Director Jerry Vattamala said: “The Asian American Exit Poll provides critical information about the Asian American electorate, including their party affiliations, issues influencing their votes in key races, and voting barriers at the polls, including improper requirements to show voter IDs or prove their citizenship and the denial of language assistance to limited English proficient voters.”

Democrats picked up 27 seats on Tuesday, winning majority control of the House of Representatives, and Republicans kept the Senate majority, picking up two seats. Democratic governors also won in 23 states, picking up seven new seats.

The following is a preliminary breakdown by state:

Vote for Senate:

Texas
64% for Beto O’Rourke, 33% for Ted Cruz, 2% other
(Cruz won 50.9% of total votes, O’Rourke 48.3%, other 0.8%)

Nevada
68% for Jackie Rosen, 28% for Dean Heller, 3% other
(Rosen won 50.4%, Heller 45.4%, other 4.2%)

Florida
71% for Bill Nelson, 21% for Rick Scott, 1% other
(Scott won 50.2%, Nelson 49.8%, other 0%, 99% reporting)

Vote for Governor:

Florida
71% for Andrew Gillum, 22% for Ron DeSantis, 1% other
(DeSantis won 49.7%, Gillum 49.1%, other 1.2%)

Georgia
82% for Stacey Abrams, 15% for Brian Kemp, 3% other
(Kemp won 50.3%, Abrams 48.7%, other 0.9%, potential runoff)

Michigan
91% for Gretchen Whitmer, 7% for Bill Schuette, 1% other
(Whitmer won 53.1%, Schuette 44.0%, other 2.8%)

Ballot Propositions
Asian Americans overwhelmingly supported two ballot propositions in Florida and Massachusetts.

In Florida, 68% of Asian Americans polled supported Amendment 4, which re-enfranchised 1.4 million ex-felons, compared to 26% who opposed this amendment. Amendment 4 passed 64.5% to 35.5%.

In Massachusetts, 74% of Asian Americans polled supported Question 3 and 13% opposed Question 3, which upheld a state law protecting transgender people in public accommodations. Question 3 passed 68% to 32%.

Asian American voters also faced many barriers on Election Day – including machine breakdowns, being directed to incorrect poll sites, denied provisional ballots and access to language assistance, and illegal demands for proof of identification and citizenship when it was not required.

Poll sites in AALDEF’s exit poll were selected based on voter registration files, census data, interviews with local election officials and community leaders, and a history of voting problems. Approximately 600 attorneys, law students, and community volunteers were stationed at poll sites throughout the day, generally between 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Surveys were written in English and 11 Asian languages, and volunteers were conversant in Asian languages and dialects. Additional exit poll results regarding Asian ethnic groups, most important issues influencing their votes, and preferences for House candidates will be released soon.

See my column on the TRUMP PRESS CONFERENCE and the FIRING OF JEFF SESSIONS.

Emil Guillermo’s Amok PODCAST: Todd Endo calls in from Selma about being at the 50th anniversary of the historic marches

toddendomarchingAsian American activist Todd Endo was in Selma 50 years ago, just as he  was at the march on Washington in 1963 to hear Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech.  (I took this photo of him at the 50th anniversary of that march in 2015).

This weekend, Endo called in from Selma where he attended the big anniversary of the marches there.  We talked about what he felt then and now,  about what he saw, and the Asian Americans at the event, including a Chinese American who was also at Selma in 1965.

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Update: SF’s David Chiu beats David Campos in Assembly District 17; Midterm mugging: For first time in 8 years, GOP in charge. Nancy Pelosi still minority leader, but Mike Honda still in Congress.

UPDATED: In the hotly contested San Francisco Assembly District 17 race, David Chiu has issued this statement on Facebook that his opponent, David Campos, has conceded.

Close race between two colleagues that got nasty. But that’s politics.

 

Nov.5: People hate Congress, but they like their guy. How else do you describe the way Democratic Incumbent Mike Honda in CA-17 was able to beat back Ro Khanna, the disruptive Democrat who failed despite big money and endorsements.

Goes to show you, avuncular beats upstart. In politics, style counts for something.

But Honda’s victory is not enough to make Nancy Pelosi happy. She’s still in the minority, but even deeper in the hole now.

It rained at the Giants parade, and on Tuesday it poured. Two more years of political smiles.

Last week she had the Senate, now all she has is a lame duck president to lean on.

And an orange rally rag to remind her what it feels like to be a World Champion.

 

 

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S.F. Mayor Ed Lee works overtime for #SOTU: Maximum Asian, minimum wage in the land of inequality; updated 3:42PDT with preview excerpts

Some observers might think San Francisco must be on President Obama’s “Do Not Call” list after that embarrassing incident during his last visit. That’s when one of the handpicked invitees who stood behind Obama spoke out and disrupted the president’s speech.  ( http://aaldef.org/blog/yelling-stop-deportations-an-undocumented-asian-american-stands-up-and-obama-stands-down.html ).

But Obama is merely showing how you can’t let a little thing like that spoil your good attitude. We’re not talking Chris Christie here.

Obama is moving on, because Ed Lee can help him.

So instead of a “shunning,” the president is shining a light on the San Francisco mayor.

Lee fills a number of purposes for President Obama at the #SOTU.  If anyone asks,”Is there an Asian American in the house? ” Well, now there will be.  (They won’t be in the bomb shelter). As Michelle’s guest, Lee is the son of Chinese immigrants, the first Asian American mayor of San Francisco in the nation’s most Asian American state.

But Lee’s real purpose may be to be the bureaucratic face and prime working example of an elevated minimum wage. SeaTac in Washington has a $15 minimum. But SeaTac is not San Francisco, and Obama needs to show a major city example. That’s SF, with the next highest minimum wage at $10.55 an hour.

Obama wants to raise the fed minimum to $10.10, up from $7.25.

At a time when inequality has become Obama’s “here-and-now”  issue, having Lee there is critical to show everyone that $10.10 is do-able. SeaTac is struggling with $15. But new studies show SF’s businesses haven’t been hurt by years of an elevated minimum wage, well above $7. In fact, even conservatives like Bill O’Reilly are coming around to embrace the issue of raising the MW.

Maybe that’s because minimum wages mean conservatives can feel good about finally taxing the poor.

But really, what’s $10.10 an hour?  Multiply that by 30 hours (because then bosses wouldn’t have to pay benefits). Then work for 50 weeks and voila. You’re barely above $15,000 a year.

Shack up with another minimum wage earner, don’t have kids, and live in your parent’s trailer, and you can survive on $30,000 a year combined. Sure, why not. (You want to eat too? And have clothes? Wow, no one told O’Reilly that).

No, of course it’s do-able.

You won’t be among the One-percent though.

Maybe this is Obama’s way to discourage future immigration to the U.S.?  Land of opportunity?

No, America is the “new”  land of inequality.

UPDATE:

Preview excerpts from President Obama’s SOTU  address– (Second to last graph (bolded) is perhaps the most direct in terms of president’s intention to by-pass Congress if he needs to get things done).
“In the coming months, let’s see where else we can make progress together.  Let’s make this a year of action.  That’s what most Americans want – for all of us in this chamber to focus on their lives, their hopes, their aspirations.  And what I believe unites the people of this nation, regardless of race or region or party, young or old, rich or poor, is the simple, profound belief in opportunity for all – the notion that if you work hard and take responsibility, you can get ahead.

 

Let’s face it: that belief has suffered some serious blows.  Over more than three decades, even before the Great Recession hit, massive shifts in technology and global competition had eliminated a lot of good, middle-class jobs, and weakened the economic foundations that families depend on.

 

Today, after four years of economic growth, corporate profits and stock prices have rarely been higher, and those at the top have never done better.  But average wages have barely budged.  Inequality has deepened.  Upward mobility has stalled.  The cold, hard fact is that even in the midst of recovery, too many Americans are working more than ever just to get by – let alone get ahead.  And too many still aren’t working at all.

 

Our job is to reverse these tides.  It won’t happen right away, and we won’t agree on everything.  But what I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth, strengthen the middle class, and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class.  Some require Congressional action, and I’m eager to work with all of you.  But America does not stand still – and neither will I.  So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that’s what I’m going to do.” 

….

“Opportunity is who we are.  And the defining project of our generation is to restore that promise.”

(End of excerpt).

 

 

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