Tag Archives: American Filipino

Emil Guillermo: Here’s where you can read and even listen to “Emil Amok,” like besides here at www.amok.com. Almost everything you’d want to know about what I’m up to, but somehow never bothered to Google. Or just click on the links to current tweets on the left of amok homepage for my latest amokness.

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Dear Amok readers:

You may have noticed, I  haven’t always been posting here on my site.

But click on this big link to see my writing at the Asian American Legal Defense Fund blog where I post columns each week.

My plan is to post my podcast here, a return to my radio days.

Real audio where you can hear stuff like I did on NPR.

So look for the podcast soon.

I am also working on some live performance projects.

A solo show on American Filipinos, “All Pucked Up.”

Some stand up for those with short-attention spans.

After dinner speeches for those with iron stomachs.

E-mail me at emilamok@gmail.com to book or for information on coming shows, mics, black box appearances, pop ups, etc.

In the meantime, I’m writing a lot about the campaign and other news  on the AALDEF blog,

And here on the Diverse blog.

And on Asian American issues in general   on the NBC News.com website.

So lots of places to go amok, besides right  here at amok.com.

Recently, it was National Dog Day, and I posted a picture of Willie, a mutt I named after my Dad.  Willie used to sing every time he  heard a ringtone of some sort.  And then the music died.

I miss both Willies.

 

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And of course, to read a little more about me,  go here.

Now pardon me, while I school this tall guy in how to play ball in a suit and tie.

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Emil Guillermo: Why I do what I do as an Asian American journalist

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I was young when I knew I would be a writer, or somehow be in the media. At five, I was already practicing my standups.

So is it a surprise I’m still a member of AAJA?

At the 15th Asian American Journalists Association convention being held in San Francisco:

I saw a woman I met at a previous AAJA who told me she was taking a leave to have a baby. With her female partner.

I saw a person with his wife and two young kids, making it a family vacation. Last I heard, he was not regularly employed.

I saw old friends who  were recently laid off or forcibly retired.

I saw a guy who could have been my boss had he taken a job ten years ago, but who is now happy as a stay-at-home-dad.

I saw an old agent, who is now a “producer.”

I saw a former colleague still trying to make the transition to digital.

And then there was a guy who showed me his gold watch after 25 years in one place. And another guy who told me his company didn’t give out gold watches. Not even after close to 40 years.  The paycheck was enough.

Lots of stories at AAJA about the evolution of the media and the media worker.

And as tough as some tales were, there were signs of hope too.

Young guys still climbing the market ladder getting air-time coming up to me saying they saw an old tape of mine, thanking me for showing the way. Another guy getting a national shot as a fill-in on a big time show.

We’re all still there because  AAJA always felt like a safe place to gather once a year and reassess why we still do what we do.

It’s a smaller gathering these days. Many have left the business, burned out, bitter, bummed. Or becoming lawyers. Involved in some other way with life.

But many of us,  after all these years are still here. Because the paycheck alone never defined us.

This is what we do.

See my piece on “Why I Write…” on the blog of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

 

Emil Guillermo: Rachel Dolezal, Dylann Roof aren’t going to wreck my Father’s Day.

On the race beat, we were all wearying of Rachel Dolezal’s tale knowing there was something more important to talk about.

But Dylann Roof’s old fashioned racism with the fresh-faced millennial look wouldn’t have been my first choice among replacement subjects.

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Roof’s massacre was deplorable. And his  tirade against blacks, sounded like the things said about Filipino immigrants like my Dad in one of the most racist periods in California in the 20s and 30s.

It made for an unlikely Father’s Day gift I wasn’t expecting.

Click here to read my column  on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund blog.

 

Emil Guillermo: Do Asian American lives really matter?

My cousin Stephen, an immigrant who had naturalized as an American, a proud Asian American of Filipino descent,  was shot and killed a year ago.

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So far, the family has seen no medical examiner’s report.

No police report.

Maybe none of it ever happened?

Do Asian American lives matter?

The family has been waiting for justice.

But it seems like all we are doing is waiting for paperwork.

 

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