Tag Archives: Asian American

Emil Guillermo: Full speed ahead #SDFRINGE; Going “Amok” at the San Diego International Fringe Festival June 23- June 29

Had a great prep at the SF Marsh on Monday, same night as the Warrior victory. If you were able to test your TIVO and come out to the show, thank you.
If you didn’t, you can take a road trip to San Diego and catch my one-man show at the San Diego International Fringe Festival, June 23-June 29th! I will be performing at Horton Plaza at the Art Institute Space,
141 Horton Plaza.

Tickets here: https://sdfringe.ticketleap.com/amok-monologues/

Make it a weekend, see me, and catch some great performances all over San Diego.

Emil Guillermo: Defending the Philly Take-outs! Chinese owners discriminated against, says Councilman David Oh

After home invasions robberies in their store/residences in Philadelphia, Chinese take-out owners are banding together and sometimes even arming themselves to fight discrimination.

David Oh said there is a real potential for violence between the Asian and African American communities, in my podcast interview with him.

But he’s hoping for a way to find a peaceful resolution by bringing the communities together.

Listen to the new Podcast.

Oh speaks around 30:00 in.

Also more on David Dao/United; Trump’s 100th day; and the 25th Anniversary of the LA Riots–from the Korean American perspective on “Emil Amok’s Takeout”

Emil Guillermo: New Amok podcast, “Emil Amok’s Takeout,” on the kidnapping claims of the forgotten people of the Japanese Internment during WWII, Japanese from Latin America

You can call it “The Other Roundup.”
Art Shibayama will tell you exactly what it meant to him and why all Americans need to be ashamed.

Shibayama was just a 12-year-old boy in Lima,Peru. A Peruvian citizen.
His whole family was taken by the U.S. government and incarcerated in America.

If you don’t know about the Japanese Latin American part of the World War II internment story, you’re not alone.

When Executive Order 9066 cleared the way for the round-up of Japanese and Japanese Americans in the U.S. at the start of World War II, a different kind  of roundup was taking place in Latin America, especially Peru.

The U.S. government was taking Latin American citizens of Japanese descent, what the victims call kidnappings. Those taken were of all ages, and often, whole families were rounded-up. They were placed on U.S. ships and took a long boat ride to America.  They lived in camps like one set up in Crystal City, Texas.

Art Shibayama says they were kidnapped to provide the U.S. a supply of pawns to trade for U.S. GIs held by the Japanese.

His story on my podcast, “Emil Amok’s Takeout.”

Listen on-demand. Subscribe on iTunes and never miss an episode.

 

 

Use the player to access this episode and more:

Emil Guillermo: Here’s where you can read and even listen to “Emil Amok,” like besides here at www.amok.com. Almost everything you’d want to know about what I’m up to, but somehow never bothered to Google. Or just click on the links to current tweets on the left of amok homepage for my latest amokness.

AMOKlogo

Dear Amok readers:

You may have noticed, I  haven’t always been posting here on my site.

But click on this big link to see my writing at the Asian American Legal Defense Fund blog where I post columns each week.

My plan is to post my podcast here, a return to my radio days.

Real audio where you can hear stuff like I did on NPR.

So look for the podcast soon.

I am also working on some live performance projects.

A solo show on American Filipinos, “All Pucked Up.”

Some stand up for those with short-attention spans.

After dinner speeches for those with iron stomachs.

E-mail me at emilamok@gmail.com to book or for information on coming shows, mics, black box appearances, pop ups, etc.

In the meantime, I’m writing a lot about the campaign and other news  on the AALDEF blog,

And here on the Diverse blog.

And on Asian American issues in general   on the NBC News.com website.

So lots of places to go amok, besides right  here at amok.com.

Recently, it was National Dog Day, and I posted a picture of Willie, a mutt I named after my Dad.  Willie used to sing every time he  heard a ringtone of some sort.  And then the music died.

I miss both Willies.

 

Cq0fgRiXgAAqMHk

And of course, to read a little more about me,  go here.

Now pardon me, while I school this tall guy in how to play ball in a suit and tie.

Ce4_5yTWwAAI1yO

Emil Guillermo: Washington Post’s “C-man” Yao headline only revives spirit of initial Shaq FU transgression

yaoheadline

The Washington Post won’t apologize for that “C-man” headline about Yao Ming it used the other day.

Instead of showing some sensitivity, the Post  preferred to show off the slur in its full glory.

Because, of course, there’s nothing like getting in a second helping of hate rhetoric when you can under the guise of reporting.

Ultimately, editors did change the word.  They just didn’t really  apologize.

But say if the story were about a top black player. Would an editor have used a black ethnic slur now commonly referred to as the “N” word?  Or would they have truncated it or avoided the word choice completely  to accommodate DC’s black readers?

So one must ask,  why don’t Wash Post’s editors respect  its  Asian American readers more than they do?

Putting the word  out there in all its glory legitimizes the slur in a way.  It says,  “It’s OK, we saw it in the Post. ”

Even the original culprit, Shaquille O’Neal offered an apology. If you want to read about the incident check out this link to my 2011 post which includes a link to my original 2003 article that talks about how Shaq’s Yao FU began.

Incidentally, even Steve Kerr, the Golden State  Warriors coach, was involved in a slur incident involving Yao.

Kerr was a TV commentator at the time,  and has since apologized.

But that’s how little respect Asian Americans had in 2003.

And even now,  apparently.

And  as much as I am a Golden State Warrior fan, and hope they break the record, I must confess I don’t forget the incident whenever I see Kerr,  or even Shaq for that matter,  on TV.

That’s how deep transgressions go.

Apology or no apology, media slurs cut deep

.

 

 

Emil Guillermo: The latest posts and thoughts from me!

Check the latest columns on SCOTUS, Unions, Brussels, Donald Trump and more on the AALDEF blog.

 

The Donald trails in Wisconsin. When he doesn’t talk about polls, what does he talk about? He is about the act of running. Policy? He’d rather outsource that.  By confusing capitalism with democracy, he isn’t taking the time to bother with the issues. If you heard his thoughts on abortion, nuclear weapons, and other things this week, then you know that the Donald sounded like he was channeling Gary Busey on “Celebrity Apprentice.”

BRUSSELS:  Here’s a picture of the Filipino American woman who was one of the victims.  She was with her husband and four children at the airport. They survived. She did not.

SEE my reporting on the NBCNews.com Asian America site.

gailmartinezandkato

Emil Guillermo: Scalia’s death has made everyone notice this election season.

 

 

If you were on the sidelines waiting for everyone to duke it out, then planning to very quietly cast a ballot in November, that all changed.

Now the stakes are as clear as ever.

The future of the nation isn’t about the presidency, nor the Senate.

But both play a role in choosing a Supreme Court justice.

You may not have considered that as important heretofore.

But you should now.

There’s a lot of guff about the Senate blocking Obama from naming a person.

But there is the constitution which says every nominee deserves an up/down vote. I don’t think the Senate can block an acceptable nominee indefinitely.

If Obama is shrewd, and he no doubt will be, his choice will be someone who has bi-partisan appeal.  Someone who has been supported by conservatives.

A few come to mind. And one is a Filipino American woman who heads the California Supreme Court.

See my column here on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund blog.

There’s much at stake in this current court year from Obamacare to affirmative action to union and labor issues.  there have been many 5-4 decisions. If there’s a 4-4 tie, the lower court rulings will stand.

It’s critical to get a replacement for Scalia now.

And that’s why every one will now be glued to politics.

Special interests? It’s in all our interests to get this right–the best interests of our American Democracy.

And it’s not just Scalia’s replacement. With a number of judges approaching retirement age, the next group of appointees to come will impact the nation for the next 25 years or more.

If you haven’t been paying attention, Scalia’s passing demands you pay attention now.