Posts Tagged emil guillermo

Coming this Sunday, 7-20! Me! Live! On stage! On stage?

 

 

Been developing a solo performance piece that puts into context  the death of my cousin Stephen and the history of Filipinos in America.

Come see where I am as I show a bit of it  at this series at Stage Werx in San Francisco at 7pm this Sunday the 2oth.

Buy your tickets here, and tell them Emil sent you. It will score all of us brownie points!

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/757139

I tell Stephen's story in my new solo theatre piece. Come see it!

I tell Stephen’s story in my new solo theatre piece. Come see it!

 

CHECK OUT THE NEW HOME FOR THE AMOK COLUMN: www.aaldef.org/blog

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Emil Guillermo’s Amok: Ricardo Alvarado’s Eyes–Celebrating San Francisco’s Centennial Manongs

When I first met Janet Alvarado in the mid-80s, she was just like me—a young American-born Filipino.

Only she had a box of photographs and a dream.

The photographs were taken by her dad, Ricardo Alvarado. The dream was to share his vision.

Almost 30 years later,  it’s all come true.

The Alvarado Project, as it’s called, has been honored by the Smithsonian, toured around the country, and is about to grow in scope with another chapter–this time honoring Alvarado’s wife Norberta and her beloved Leyte.

But first things first, Ricardo Alvarado would have been 100 on February 7.

It’s only fitting to close the first chapter by honoring Ricardo Alvarado’s centennial year.

I admit when I first saw his photographs, I didn’t grasp how special they were. Why would they be? They were shots of neighborhoods that Filipinos lived in. Images of the parties Filipino families attended. They looked like my life in San Francisco in the 1950s, ‘60s, and ‘70s. My American Filipino life.

Silly me.

That’s what gives them their power. The photographs recall the specialness of life that few regarded as special back then.

It was just us.

Who was looking at American Filipino life like it mattered back then? Before Asian American studies, or ethnic studies? Before there was a sense of pride within the American community?

Not many.

Ricardo Alvarado was in that first wave of immigrants to San Francisco. He came to America looking for opportunity in 1928. But instead, he found that people wanted to shut the door almost as soon as he arrived. It was the depression. The height of racism and violence toward Filipinos came in 1930. In San Francisco, we were called “monkey.”

No one thought the community was particularly photogenic back then.

Typical of many Filipinos, Ricardo Alvarado endured and was able to join the Army. After WWII, he returned to marry a Filipina, start a family and buy a home in San Francisco on the GI Bill.

And the community blossomed.

The family and the community became the subjects of Ricardo’s  lifelong love affair with photography.

More than the snapshots and the lineups most people took with the Brownie and  Instamatic,Alvarado was armed with a view camera,  documenting and preserving the look of American Filipino life.

As his daughter  realized, the images weren’t  just for people to gaze at then.

More meaningfully, the photography was the bridge from their present to the future, so that others could wonder what it was like” back then. “ 

And at their best, they represented the most artful photographs of the early American Filipino community in San Francisco, if not the entire U.S.

So while you may have placed your photos in deep storage, or heaven forbid, thrown them out as basura, Janet Alvarado knew she had something more than sentimental memories.

These were lasting images of the community.

That others didn’t keep even the basic shots of everyday, make Ricardo Alvarado’s photographs even more special.

That’s the value of the Alvarado Project.  We call it diaspora now, but then, the global Filipino was a few neighborhoods in San Francisco, and other places in California. How did we live? No one thought we were special enough to preserve and document on film, let alone study like some lost tribe in the Filipinos.

We were more like a new colony in America.

After surviving the 1920s, ‘30s, and the War, American Filipinos were  just happy to be alive.

Ricardo Alvarado knew that was photogenic.

MY DAD, WILLIE GUILLERMO AND THE SOUTH OF MARKET

When we gather in the South of Market on the 15th to celebrate Ricardo Alvarado,  Janet Alvarado has been gracious enough to allow me to mention my father, the late Willie Guillermo, already a member of the Centennial Club.

Though Filipinos lived all over the city, in the Western Addition, Fillmore, and BayView, most began their journey in the South of Market.

My family started on Kissling Street by St. Josephs, then moved to the Western Addition on Fulton St. My Uncle Joe was in the Fillmore on McAllister, under the appliance store light that would blink “HOTPOINT.” It was the hot spot for our family.

But Sixth Street was for fun. And that’s where my Dad would often return to hang-out with the other Filipinos of his generation who saw in Sixth Street as a the playground for Ma Jong, cards, dancing.

My dad would take me to the barber college for the cheap haircuts.

This month, my dad would have been 108.

That’s the irony. I thought my dad was 108 when he was alive.

Like Ricardo Alvarado, my dad came to America in the 1920s but was much older. He didn’t go to war and missed out on the GI Bill. But he didn’t miss out when more Filipinas were able to come to America after the war.

Until then, there weren’t many Filipinas to marry. And because of anti-intermarriage laws, Filipinos were essentially a bachelor society. Roving packs of bachelors.

It meant that when more were able to find wives, and start families later in life, there would be a lot of older dads.

I had one of them.  And I admit that as a kid I was ashamed, not of his being Filipino. It was his being old. He was grandfather and father all rolled into one. And he took me to that damn barber college for the cheap haircuts.

Today, Dad as a perennial 108-year-old makes sense.

And as I approach 108 myself, I am far more sympathetic.

It was history that helped me understand, and photographs that helped me recall–not just where we came from, but what we had overcome.

It is said that the offspring of the immigrants were the “bridge” generation. To what? To American life.

Maybe, but the bridges that have the lasting connections between the ancestral home and the present were formed by our fathers, the Manongs like my dad and Ricardo Alvarado.

On the 15th, we’ll honor them, members of the Centennial Club.

 

 

INFORMATION:

Date: Saturday, February 15, 2014 The Centennial Celebration

Time: 2 pm to 5 pm

Place: BAYAHIHAN COMMUNITY CENTER, 1010 Mission Street (near 6th Street), San Francisco, CA

Parking lot on 6th & Mission Street next to Bayanihan Center or at 5th & Mission Garage

Join us in a community salute to the San Francisco pioneering generation and communities. Remarks and discussion from invited guests celebrating Alvarado’s photographs in a nod back to “Through My Father’s Eyes”. 

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My first amok act in the birthplace of amok–Malaysia

When you have the domain www.amok.com, it is a special day indeed when among your first moments in Malaysia, the birth place of amok (the word does have Malay origins), is actually going amok in a tri-shaw. Actually, I was assisted by my right-hand (and left-hand) man, the ultra capable Ming. The importance of having him for both my hands is evident, especially if you look closely by my left ear. You can see Ming’s hand on the handlebars (of the tri-shaw, not my ears). Note: Ming is holding a cigarette and not some weapon. No sharp implements were brandished as we ran amok through Old Georgetown in Penang, Malaysia.

 

CHECK OUT THE NEW HOME FOR THE AMOK COLUMN: www.aaldef.org/blog

LIKE  and FOLLOW us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/emilguillermo.media

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Adventures in learning Facebook: I’m back on, but I didn’t get married on it

I just started up on Facebook again.

Maybe it was because I just went to a journalism conference and there was more interest it seemed in the digital media than there was in any other form of media. Should I trust it, most of the people at the conference don’t even know what a typewriter was.  But it’s a fact. FB is the internet, the better AOL, the place where people are. So I  am now on Facebook:

I’m on “Emil Guillermo Media”    https://www.facebook.com/emilguillermo.media  Like me there.

And so as not to confuse my professional writing from my personal musings and pictures of food and stuff Asian Americans like me  like to post:

https://www.facebook.com/emil.Guillermo

You will note that I was an early adopter of FB, starting up when they opened to the general  public in 2007. But I’m slow. I  didn’t become addicted until last week.

That’s all as a preface to this  note I posted on FB last week and that I repost here on my personal website. You see, I had an unintentional “life event” on FB, and I got to see how FB works so powerfully to connect people at the drop of the hat.

But as the Wall Street Journal would say, it required some “Clarification and Amplifcation.”

Here’s my note:

Dear Friends. I won’t bury the lead. I didn’t get married today. But hear me out, it’s kind of an interesting story. This is the first time I’ve been able to get to the computer to make amends for my errant post this a.m. As many of you know, I have “stayed away” from Facebook for many years. I was a bad FB’er. Maybe it was because I remember the original hardbound Facebook, where I would try to figure out how to meet some cute freshman from Radcliffe. But recently, I’ve been convinced that I should get on this thing (Zuckerberg will have Asian American babies and they will need help fighting any glass ceilings they might face). It’s also better than “aol” and where else can I go on the internet? www.amok.com? So I have become a “user.” But still a neophyte. As I adjusted my status from “nothing” to “married,” I was in the wrong update area. And so instead of simply saying “I’m married,” it posted I had a life event and “got married.” This, of course, was news to my wife of 26 years as well. So this is turning into a life event all the same. I am hearing from many people who wish me well. I am grateful for that and I’m sorry to alarm you, though it is a bit like a happier, cyber version of Huck and Tom attending their own funeral. My wife Kathy and I actually eloped and many years ago (26 years this month) and never had a big party, so this is a reminder that when we do get around to that big party, you all can show up on FB and real life. We weren’t registered anywhere for this, so no harm there. I’m just gratified to see so many well wishers and hope this explanation helps straighten things out. And please rest assured, I did not do this to get another column topic. Though, I will add this to my file of “Adventures in learning FB.” This is my personal site where you will get stuff like this.Go to the Emil Guillermo Media fb site to get my other writing. Best to you all, Emil  P.S. and next time I get married, you definitely will be the first to know.

https://www.facebook.com/emilguillermo.media

 

 

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