Emil Guillermo: Majority of Asian Americans joined in the 2018 midterm rebuke of Trump, according to AALDEF Asian American Exit Poll findings (NEW)

The mainstream media never gets a big enough sample to say anything about Asian Americans.
Here are the results from the AALDEF exit poll of 7,600 Asian Americans in 50 cities in 14 states.
The findings are clear.
The majority of Asian Americans joined in the rebuke of Donald Trump in the 2018 midterm elections.

AALDEF’s Election Day exit poll of more than 7,600 Asian American voters, Democratic candidates were favored over Republicans by wide margins

New York City… AALDEF’s preliminary exit poll results of more than 7,600 Asian American voters in the 2018 midterm elections reveal that Asian Americans strongly favored Democratic Senate and Gubernatorial candidates in closely-contested races in Texas, Georgia, Nevada, and Florida.

Asian American voters polled also disapproved of Donald Trump’s performance as president, with 65% disapproving and 21% approving, a factor that likely affected their votes in key elections.

“The racist and anti-immigrant rhetoric from Donald Trump has been deeply disturbing to Asian American voters, who overwhelmingly supported candidates who share their values of a more inclusive and diverse America,” said Margaret Fung, AALDEF executive director.

AALDEF dispatched more than 600 attorneys, law students, and community volunteers to 50 cities in 14 states to document voter problems on Election Day and to conduct a nonpartisan Asian American exit poll in English and 11 Asian languages Asian Americans were polled in California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, DC.

AALDEF Democracy Program Director Jerry Vattamala said: “The Asian American Exit Poll provides critical information about the Asian American electorate, including their party affiliations, issues influencing their votes in key races, and voting barriers at the polls, including improper requirements to show voter IDs or prove their citizenship and the denial of language assistance to limited English proficient voters.”

Democrats picked up 27 seats on Tuesday, winning majority control of the House of Representatives, and Republicans kept the Senate majority, picking up two seats. Democratic governors also won in 23 states, picking up seven new seats.

The following is a preliminary breakdown by state:

Vote for Senate:

Texas
64% for Beto O’Rourke, 33% for Ted Cruz, 2% other
(Cruz won 50.9% of total votes, O’Rourke 48.3%, other 0.8%)

Nevada
68% for Jackie Rosen, 28% for Dean Heller, 3% other
(Rosen won 50.4%, Heller 45.4%, other 4.2%)

Florida
71% for Bill Nelson, 21% for Rick Scott, 1% other
(Scott won 50.2%, Nelson 49.8%, other 0%, 99% reporting)

Vote for Governor:

Florida
71% for Andrew Gillum, 22% for Ron DeSantis, 1% other
(DeSantis won 49.7%, Gillum 49.1%, other 1.2%)

Georgia
82% for Stacey Abrams, 15% for Brian Kemp, 3% other
(Kemp won 50.3%, Abrams 48.7%, other 0.9%, potential runoff)

Michigan
91% for Gretchen Whitmer, 7% for Bill Schuette, 1% other
(Whitmer won 53.1%, Schuette 44.0%, other 2.8%)

Ballot Propositions
Asian Americans overwhelmingly supported two ballot propositions in Florida and Massachusetts.

In Florida, 68% of Asian Americans polled supported Amendment 4, which re-enfranchised 1.4 million ex-felons, compared to 26% who opposed this amendment. Amendment 4 passed 64.5% to 35.5%.

In Massachusetts, 74% of Asian Americans polled supported Question 3 and 13% opposed Question 3, which upheld a state law protecting transgender people in public accommodations. Question 3 passed 68% to 32%.

Asian American voters also faced many barriers on Election Day – including machine breakdowns, being directed to incorrect poll sites, denied provisional ballots and access to language assistance, and illegal demands for proof of identification and citizenship when it was not required.

Poll sites in AALDEF’s exit poll were selected based on voter registration files, census data, interviews with local election officials and community leaders, and a history of voting problems. Approximately 600 attorneys, law students, and community volunteers were stationed at poll sites throughout the day, generally between 7:00 am to 8:00 pm. Surveys were written in English and 11 Asian languages, and volunteers were conversant in Asian languages and dialects. Additional exit poll results regarding Asian ethnic groups, most important issues influencing their votes, and preferences for House candidates will be released soon.

See my column on the TRUMP PRESS CONFERENCE and the FIRING OF JEFF SESSIONS.

Emil Guillermo: Next “Amok”? Sept. 30, Sunday, 2pm at FANHS National Museum in Stockton. Get ticket links to the “story show,” and see where to read my Amok columns!

Tickets for the next story show? 

It’s a story show and work shop to help you tell your own story.

Don’t miss it at the FANHS National Museum,  337 E. Weber Ave, Stockton, CA

Arrive early to see the museum or lunch at a nearby Filipino restaurant. Digest it all during the show. Get inspired, be a part of the interview “talk” show part, and let me get the story out of you. You will leave with a real blue print for a story that you can perform, refine, or just tell to your loved ones.

Donations, $10 to benefit the museum. Get your tickets in advance.

Keep reading my regular  Amok columns at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.
(Listen to a robot read an Amok column on this link).

Also at inquirer.net.

And diverseeducation.com.

And listen to my podcasts:

The PETA PODCAST

and

Emil Amok’s Takeout

Emil Guillermo: Thank you for “Amok Monologues” at Manilatown; See future shows, workshops. And where to read Emil

Thank you all for the great response at to “Amok Monologues” at SF’s Manilatown Last Friday!

Check back here to see where I’ll be popping up next.

Or sign up! Send me an email and get on the list.

Next scheduled Amok excerpt and workshop is Sept. 2nd in Stockton at the FANHS National Museum at 2pm.  Learn to how to tell your story.

And keep reading my regular  Amok columns at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

Also at inquirer.net.

And diverseeducation.com.

And listen to my podcasts:

The PETA PODCAST

and

Emil Amok’s Takeout

Emil Guillermo’s Amok Monologues? Get your tickets for the Aug. 17th San Francisco show. One night only. Plus I’ll share some of my Dawn Mabalon memories.

Some proceeds will benefit Manilatown Heritage Foundation, and Dawn Mabalon’s Memorial fund.

For you last minute types… tickets will be at the door at Manilatown 868 Kearny at Jackson St. in San Francisco.

Or you can ….

Get your tickets here.

Here’s what critics say about Emil Guillermo’s  “Amok Monologues: All Pucked UP”:

“Stand-up, monologue, rant?….Enjoy trying to keep pace with Guillermo’s brilliant mind… Funny, poignant.”— Orlando Weekly.
“Keeps audience engaged.” — Orlando Sentinel
“Charismatic…Guillermo’s life is one worth exploring.” — DC Metro Theater Arts
“Excellent…Emil Guillermo knows how to tell a story and that ability sets “Amok Monologues above other solo shows.”  — San Diego Story

Aug. 17,  7:30pm,  Manilatown/I-Hotel,  868 Kearny St. in San Francisco.

Tickets $10, with part of the proceeds to benefit the Manilatown Heritage Foundation.

Click to get your tickets.

DAWN MABALON MEMORIES

I’ve spent most of this week writing about the late Dr. Dawn Mabalon.

If you’ve seen my stories on http:/www.aaldef.org/blog

or on Inquirer.net, you know I had great love and admiration for Dawn and her work.

Aug. 17, Friday would have been her birthday.   So I will share some memories after the “Amok” show when we do a talkback. It’s a little something extra.

This show is a benefit for Manilatown.  But I will make sure some proceeds from the show are given to Dawn’s fund.

 

 

 

Emil Guillermo: Mourning historian and scholar Dawn Mabalon, Filipino American activist and friend; My Manilatown show on Aug. 17th dedicated to her memory.

I’m crestfallen, recovering from the news that my friend Dawn Mabalon, a tenured professor and scholar in U.S. History at San Francisco State University, specializing in Filipinos in the American Labor movement, has died.

Dawn was a bright, energetic ball of fire who took American Filipinos and U.S. history and fused it with an activist’s passion that empowered the ignored and enlightened the ignorant.

mabalon.jpg

If you didn’t know the story, you finally got it.
If you were heretofore invisible, you were finally seen.

She didn’t bother with the veritable first draft of history, a/k/a “the news.” Dawn, who originally set out to be a journalist, looked to make a lasting impact.  She got her Ph.D at Stanford and scaled the high bar of the academy. She produced legit scholarship about us in the United States, as if we really mattered.

Dawn Mabalon’s 2013 book, “Little Manila is in the Heart: The Making of the Filipino/a American Community in Stockton, California,” presented the forgotten Filipinos of America in an historical context that could not be shoved under any old rock.

It was there for all to see: A brilliant, personal, yet accessible scholarly work.

As I pondered what Dawn meant to Filipino Americans and the telling of the broader Asian American story, someone found a Facebook post of me and Dawn from her 2013 book launch. It was ten years after I first met her when I worked the diversity beat in Stockton. Along with Dillon Delvo, her Little Manila Foundation co-founder, Dawn was a key source as I wrote stories about their successful effort to preserve the blighted blocks of Stockton’s “Little Manila” into an historical district.

Dawn-EG.jpg
Reading it now five years later just made me cry.

If all the dogeared pages of my copy are any proof, I’ve used that book she handed me like a bible. I compared my father’s story of coming to the U.S.  as a colonized American Filipino with the facts from Dawn’s scholarly work. While writing my one man show, “The Amok Monologues,” I often consulted Dawn’s book to make sure I wasn’t just true to heart, but true to history as well.

It’s the reason my Friday performance at San Francisco’s Manilatown  on Aug. 17th at 7:30 pm will be dedicated to her memory.
See the rest of my post at http://www.aaldef.org/blog

Emil Guillermo's commentary on race, politics, diversity…and everything else. It's Emil Amok's Takeout!

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