Category Archives: LISTEN to Emil’s PODCASTS

Emil Amok’s Takeout—Trump’s soft new tone hardly masks hardline on immigration. How his policies are worse than even the nadir of immigration policy, the Chinese Exclusion Act.

This was recorded before Trump’s speech before the joint session of the Congress.  But instead of overpraise for striking a civil tone, even a presidential tone, overall his words don’t match the harsh anti-immigrant actions he’s displayed in his first 40 days.

Read more at on the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund blog.

 

Emil Guillermo’s Amok PODCAST: Todd Endo calls in from Selma about being at the 50th anniversary of the historic marches

toddendomarchingAsian American activist Todd Endo was in Selma 50 years ago, just as he  was at the march on Washington in 1963 to hear Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech.  (I took this photo of him at the 50th anniversary of that march in 2015).

This weekend, Endo called in from Selma where he attended the big anniversary of the marches there.  We talked about what he felt then and now,  about what he saw, and the Asian Americans at the event, including a Chinese American who was also at Selma in 1965.

ToddVincent_edited

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Emil Guillermo on Todd Endo, an Asian American activist at Selma, and at the March on Washington.

AALDEF-Podcast-Marching-And-Talking-With-Todd-EndoAsian-American-Activist-50-Years-After-His-First-March-On-Washington-.jpg          I met Todd Endo in 2013 at the 50th anniversary of MLK’s March on Washington. It’s the event which featured King’s “I have a dream” speech. Endo marched in 1963, and he was at King’s other big march, the one two years later in Selma, 1965.

Funny how few people conflate the DC march and Selma. Or how people don’t really understand that Selma was two years after the “Dream” speech, and a year after the Civil Rights Act. Even after that momentous bit of legislation, 1965 required the Voting Rights Act, which Selma helped bring about.

As we approach the 50th anniversary of Selma, we must constantly relearn the history. Or as we’ve found out, society begins to march backwards.

My piece on Todd Endo at Selma is here.

My podcast with Endo at the 1963 March on Washington is here.

 

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PODCAST–PART 2: Arthur Chu,”Jeopardy” Champ, Talks About Race, Being Asian American, & Racist Tweets (second installment)

This is Part 2 of my conversation with Arthur Chu, the Asian American who has amassed more than $235,000 in two-weeks on “Jeopardy.”

But it’s also made him the target of racist and intimidating tweets and comments on the internet. He talks about what it’s like to be a racial minority, and how despite opportunities and success, there’s always a feeling of a  compromised sense of belonging. He hasn’t forgotten what his father told him as a young boy growing up Asian American.

But he also has chosen to be very open and  confront any racism he perceives head on.

[powerpress]http://www.amok.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Arthur-ChuJeopardyChamp-Talks-About-Race-The-Game-Racist-Tweets-Part-2.m4a[/powerpress]

 

Arthur Chu,"Jeopardy"Champ, Talks About Race, The Game, & Racist Tweets, Part 2

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PODCAST: Arthur Chu, “Jeopardy” Champ, On The Racist Twitter Reaction To His Success, And Racism in General, Part 1

Arthur Chu was in Ohio, still working as a compliance analyst for an insurance company, even though he could have many more appearances on “Jeopardy.”

At the time of our conversation he had amassed in excess of $235,000 in just two weeks of shows.

In Part 1 of our conversation, Chu talked frankly about his sudden fame, and how the initial reaction on the internet to his success was extremely racist.

He said the number of angry tweets actually surprised him. But he was most surprised that people tried to deny that race had anything to do with peoples’ response to him.

[powerpress]http://www.amok.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Arthur-Chu-Jeopardy-Champ-On-The-Racist-Twitter-Reaction-To-His-Success-Part-1.m4a[/powerpress]

 

Arthur Chu, "Jeopardy" Champ On The Racist Twitter Reaction To His Success, Part 1

 

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U.S. Rep. Mike Honda reflects on civil liberties, Fred Korematsu Day, and on his own experience as a Japanese American infant in a World War II internment camp

In this informal and candid conversation, U.S. Rep. Mike Honda, (D-CA 17) talked to me a few days before his special guest appearance at the Korematsu Institute’s celebration of Fred Korematsu.  Honda talked about the importance of Korematsu as an historical example for all people who believe in the U.S. and its Constitution. He talks about his own personal experience as an interned infant, what he remembers and how it shaped his life. The conversation took place on Jan. 24, 2014 in San Jose, CA.

[powerpress]http://www.amok.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Honda-Internment2.m4a[/powerpress]

Honda Internment2

 

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PODCAST:It’s the 40th day, and counting after Typhoon Haiyan. Rick Rocamora, UN photographer, talks about his images of the typhoon that was called Yolanda in the Philippines, and the best way people can help the nearly 4 million displaced victims there.

Rick Rocamora, an award-winning Filipino American photographer, was in the Philippines when the typhoon hit. Coincidentally, he got an assignment from the UN to document the disaster. He talks of how difficult it was to get to the region, and how tough it was to take images when there’s tragedy all around. He talked to a 7-year old boy, Ferdinand Gonzaga, suddenly orphaned, who held on to a teddy bear. He talks of people like Walter Valdez, 33, who lost his whole family and home. Valdez has left Tacloban  to live with relatives in Manila. But even there, he doesn’t know where they are.

Rocamora says the best way to help is to give to a reputable charity.( I like Catholic Relief Services out of Baltimore, MD, as it has a reputation for using money efficiently. But there are others, too https://secure.crs.org/site/Donation2;jsessionid=9A142990A14AADFE61CBDC06ADF1E4AB.app260b?df_id=6140&6140.donation=form1 )

Rocamora’s photographs are on display in San Francisco at the Exposure Gallery through mid-January.

[powerpress]http://www.amok.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Rick-Part-1.m4a[/powerpress]

Rick Part 1

 

My piece on the typhoon on CNN.com:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/12/opinion/guillermo-typhoon-haiyan/index.html?iref=allsearch

 

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